Sunday, September 30, 2012

Lemur Center Workday: Saturday, Oct 6

The Duke Lemur Center is the world's largest research facility for critically endangered lemurs from Madagascar. It's not every day that you have the opportunity to contribute to the conservation of these fascinating primates (yes, primates).


Upcoming Lemur Center Workday

Saturday, October 6
Morning: 10am - 12pm
Afternoon: 12:30 - 2:30pm

Contact us at nc.roots.shoots@gmail.com to sign up!



A Brown Lemur from within its enclosure.

Better yet, the Center is a mere 5 minute's drive from campus. 

The enclosures and part of the surrounding Duke Forest.

As a Workday volunteer, you will: 
  1. Help to maintain the enclosures, prepare lemur food and even think of creative ways to keep these highly intelligent creatures occupied. 
  2. Be entitled to a FREE TOUR in exchange for getting your hands dirty. 
  3. Get to see many wonderful lemurs like the sifaka, the aye-aye and the bush baby (or two) in the flesh.

Nocturnal Lemur Housing : Fat-tailed dwarf lemurs chilling in a bucket.

Charles the satisfied volunteer, after helping to weed the enclosures. 
Featuring 3 photobombing Sifakas.

We've scheduled a Workday this Saturday, Oct 6, so contact us at nc.roots.shoots@gmail.com before limited spaces run out. There are 2 timeslots: 10am - 12pm and 1230 - 230pm. You may sign up for one or both timeslots.

If you have a car and are willing to help us out with the 5 minute drive to the Lemur Center, let us know. Please note that spaces are limited and drivers have priority. 

We can't wait to see you at the Duke Lemur Center. 

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Chimp news from Gombe

Want to know what's going on in Gombe National Park 50 years after Jane Goodall began studying the chimps? Check out graduate student Kara's blog: http://dukeprimate.wordpress.com/category/from-the-field/

Monday, March 14, 2011

Primate Palooza 2011


The second annual Primate Palooza begins March 21!

We are still calling for art and film submissions. There will be prizes!

Check out www.primatepalooza.com and Facebook: Primate Palooza 2011 for more information.

SCHEDULE:

March 21-30 Conservation is…Art
Duke University Bryan Center

Monday, March 21 Performing Biodiversity, Dance and music showcase.
7-9pm Reynolds Theater, Duke

Wednesday March 23 Global Health and Biodiversity
6:30pm (Bingham 301, UNC-CH);

Thursday March 24 Gombe National Park: A Case Study in Research and Conservation, 5pm (BioSci 111, Duke);

Friday March 25 Strategies for Protecting Tropical Forests
4:30pm (Love Auditorium, Duke).

Saturday, March 26 & Sunday March 27 Lemur Center Tours
3:30-5pm. Sign up online at primatepalooza.com

Sunday March 27 On the Edge, Public Service Announcement screening.
7-9pm, Griffith Film Theater, Duke

Friday, February 11, 2011

Why do conservation?

Many of us are concerned about conservation issues. We care about primates. We worry about hunting and deforestation. We worry about environmental degradation. We want to protect biodiversity. But what exactly are the goals of conservationists? Is it to preserve biodiversity? To protect habitats? To save certain species from extinction?

What do you think are the goals of conservation? What does conservation mean to you?
Define any terms you use (such as biodiversity).

To determine effective strategies, it is important to understand what we are trying to do!

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Workday with Ubuntu

On Saturday, the Duke/UNC Roots & Shoots hosted our largest service day yet at the Duke Lemur Center. Twenty-five volunteers spent their mornings transporting trash to a dumpster or tearing down an old enclosure. The difference in just an hour and a half’s work was dramatic. Where a building once stood, remained only fragmented pieces. The space once occupied by a tonnage of wooden beams and other parts was now empty save the separated metal bits.

Ubuntu, Duke’s civic engagement themed living group, organized the day’s event with the help of Roots & Shoots as part of their annual ‘rush.’ Members and prospective members of Ubuntu volunteered. Fortunately, the tasks at hand were appropriate for such a large and enthusiastic group.

After the work segment, the Duke students broke up into smaller groups to receive tours of the center. The day’s terrific weather brought out the sifakas, ringtails, and other prosimians. As per the group’s focus on social change, Roots & Shoots got to talk especially about the center’s important contributions to conservation and the role of research in preserving biodiversity.

The Duke/UNC Roots & Shoots group is now developing our calendar for spring service-days at the Duke Lemur Center. If you are interested in volunteering or hosting a group of volunteers, please contact nc.roots.shoots@gmail.com


Wednesday, December 15, 2010

High schools Skype to save bonobos (and humanity)

Yesterday Aaron Sandel and Kara Schroepfer had a discussion about bonobo conservation with a high school in Minnetonka, Minnesota. The biology club had questions about Friends of Bonobos and bonobo cognition and conservation. After discussing research by Dr. Brian Hare's research team on bonobo cooperation, empathy and cognition, we discussed general conservation issues. We brainstormed the threats to bonobos, the problems facing humanity/the world and realized the solutions to both are the same (decrease poverty, increase education, facilitate empathy among people, etc.).